<div dir="ltr">Is the plan also to demote the "silicate" and "phosphate" names?  That would seem to make sense to me, consistent with Jim's points.</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 12:13 PM,  <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:martin.juckes@stfc.ac.uk" target="_blank">martin.juckes@stfc.ac.uk</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Dear Jim,<br>
<br>
thanks. I think that means that we need a corrections to the statements, from the CF Standard Name list, that:<br>
<br>
(1) '"Dissolved inorganic phosphorus" means phosphate ions in solution' in the CF Standard Name definition for mole_concentration_of_<wbr>dissolved_inorganic_<wbr>phosphorus_in_sea_water, and<br>
(2) '"Dissolved inorganic silicon" means silicate ions in solution' in the definition of mole_concentration_of_<wbr>dissolved_inorganic_silicon_<wbr>in_sea_water<br>
<br>
regards,<br>
Martin<br>
______________________________<wbr>__________<br>
From: James Orr [<a href="mailto:James.Orr@lsce.ipsl.fr">James.Orr@lsce.ipsl.fr</a>]<br>
Sent: 24 March 2017 15:46<br>
To: Lowry, Roy K.<br>
Cc: Juckes, Martin (STFC,RAL,RALSP); <a href="mailto:cf-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu">cf-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu</a><br>
Subject: Re: [CF-metadata] Silicate vs. dissolved inorganic silicon<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br>
Dissolved inorganic phosphorus in seawater takes several forms, with<br>
phosphate (P043-) being only one of them. Furthermore, PO43- is not<br>
even the most abundant form at normal seawater pH. Rather it is HPO42-<br>
(hydrogen phosphate). Oceanographers do often refer to phosphate but<br>
what they really taking about is total dissolved inorganic phosphorus<br>
(the sum of all inorganic forms).<br>
<br>
The seawater system for dissolved inorganic silicon is simpler because<br>
we only need to consider two forms: silicic acid (Si(OH)4) and silicate<br>
(SiO(OH)3-). The former is more abundant than the latter in seawater.<br>
<br>
It is best then to refer to<br>
- total dissolved inorganic phosphorus rather than phosphate and<br>
- total dissolved inorganic silicon rather than silicate.<br>
<br>
For more insight see the last figure in the OMIP-BGC protocols paper<br>
in the CMIP6 special issue at<br>
<br>
<a href="http://www.geosci-model-dev-discuss.net/gmd-2016-155/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">http://www.geosci-model-dev-<wbr>discuss.net/gmd-2016-155/</a><br>
<br>
Cheers,<br>
<br>
Jim<br>
<br>
On Fri, 24 Mar 2017, Lowry, Roy K. wrote:<br>
<br>
> Dear All,<br>
><br>
><br>
> If one makes the assumption that all the silicon and phosphorus atoms not associated with organic ligands are<br>
> in a single chemical form associated with oxygen in solution then what Martin says is correct. In my<br>
> experience I have never known anybody challenge this assumption and I cannot think of any other anions<br>
> incorporating P and Si. Consequently, I would agree that whilst there is a theoretical semantic difference<br>
> between the members of each Standard Name pair I would agree that this could be ignored and they could be<br>
> considered synonyms.<br>
><br>
><br>
> Note, this only holds true as these are MOLE concentrations. The MASS concentration of inorganic phosphorus<br>
> is very different from the MASS concentration of phosphate as the oxygen atoms have mass.<br>
><br>
><br>
> If the decision is taken to take action on this then I would recommend that the 'inorganic_silicon' and<br>
> 'inorganic_phosphorus' names be than ones to be converted to aliases. This is based on common terminology<br>
> usage in the oceanographic community.<br>
><br>
><br>
> Cheers, Roy.<br>
><br>
><br>
> Please note that I partially retired on 01/11/2015. I am now only working 7.5 hours a week and can only<br>
> guarantee e-mail response on Wednesdays, my day in the office. All vocabulary queries should be sent to<br>
> <a href="mailto:enquiries@bodc.ac.uk">enquiries@bodc.ac.uk</a>. Please also use this e-mail if your requirement is urgent.<br>
><br>
><br>
><br>
> ______________________________<wbr>______________________________<wbr>______________________________<wbr>___________________<br>
> From: CF-metadata <<a href="mailto:cf-metadata-bounces@cgd.ucar.edu">cf-metadata-bounces@cgd.ucar.<wbr>edu</a>> on behalf of <a href="mailto:martin.juckes@stfc.ac.uk">martin.juckes@stfc.ac.uk</a><br>
> <<a href="mailto:martin.juckes@stfc.ac.uk">martin.juckes@stfc.ac.uk</a>><br>
> Sent: 24 March 2017 08:48<br>
> To: <a href="mailto:cf-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu">cf-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu</a><br>
> Subject: [CF-metadata] Silicate vs. dissolved inorganic silicon<br>
> Hello Alison, others,<br>
><br>
> the standard name list includes both<br>
> (1) mole_concentration_of_<wbr>dissolved_inorganic_silicon_<wbr>in_sea_water and (2)<br>
> mole_concentration_of_<wbr>silicate_in_sea_water<br>
><br>
> The definition of the first says that "dissolved inorganic silicon" means silicate ions in solution. Both<br>
> have units of "mol m-3". It looks to me as though they are describing the same thing. If this is true, should<br>
> one be demoted to the alias of the other? If they are different, what is the difference?<br>
><br>
> The same question applies to mole_concentration_of_<wbr>dissolved_inorganic_<wbr>phosphorus_in_sea_water and<br>
> mole_concentration_of_<wbr>phosphate_in_sea_water.<br>
><br>
> regards,<br>
> Martin<br>
><br>
> ______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
> CF-metadata mailing list<br>
> <a href="mailto:CF-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu">CF-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu</a><br>
> <a href="http://mailman.cgd.ucar.edu/mailman/listinfo/cf-metadata" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">http://mailman.cgd.ucar.edu/<wbr>mailman/listinfo/cf-metadata</a><br>
> CF-metadata Info Page - <a href="http://mailman.cgd.ucar.edu" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">mailman.cgd.ucar.edu</a> Mailing Lists<br>
> <a href="http://mailman.cgd.ucar.edu" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">mailman.cgd.ucar.edu</a><br>
> This is an unmoderated list for discussions about interpretation, clarification, and proposals for extensions<br>
> or change to the CF conventions.<br>
><br>
><br>
> ______________________________<wbr>______________________________<wbr>______________________________<wbr>___________________<br>
> This message (and any attachments) is for the recipient only. NERC is subject to the Freedom of Information<br>
> Act 2000 and the contents of this email and any reply you make may be disclosed by NERC unless it is exempt<br>
> from release under the Act. Any material supplied to NERC may be stored in an electronic records management<br>
> system.<br>
><br>
> ______________________________<wbr>______________________________<wbr>______________________________<wbr>___________________<br>
><br>
><br>
<br>
--<br>
LSCE/IPSL, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement<br>
CEA-CNRS-UVSQ<br>
<br>
LSCE/IPSL, CEA Saclay <a href="http://www.ipsl.jussieu.fr/~jomce" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">http://www.ipsl.jussieu.fr/~<wbr>jomce</a><br>
Bat. 712 - Orme mailto: <a href="mailto:James.Orr@lsce.ipsl.fr">James.Orr@lsce.ipsl.fr</a><br>
Point courrier 132<br>
F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex Phone: (33) (0)1 69 08 39 73<br>
FRANCE Fax: (33) (0)1 69 08 30 73<br>
______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
CF-metadata mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:CF-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu">CF-metadata@cgd.ucar.edu</a><br>
<a href="http://mailman.cgd.ucar.edu/mailman/listinfo/cf-metadata" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer">http://mailman.cgd.ucar.edu/<wbr>mailman/listinfo/cf-metadata</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>